A year later a monument honouring police and military stands in the same place where hundreds of civilians were massacred.

One year ago today, the world watched in horror as one the single bloodiest days in modern protest history took place in Cairo, Egypt.
On August 14, 2013 Egyptian security forces opened fire at a sit-in protest in Rabaa Al Adawiya Square, killing more than 800 people opposed to the ousting of Egypt’s first democratically-elected president Mohamed Morsi. 
A few weeks earlier, the reign of Morsi, a senior Muslim Brotherhood member, was cut short after only one year in power. Morsi’s ouster was announced on July 3 2013 by the head of the Egyptian Armed Forces Abdel Fattah El Sisi, who later became the president of Egypt.
The Day More Than 800 Egyptian Protesters Died: One Year on Remembering the Horrific Raba’a Massacre

A year later a monument honouring police and military stands in the same place where hundreds of civilians were massacred.

One year ago today, the world watched in horror as one the single bloodiest days in modern protest history took place in Cairo, Egypt.

On August 14, 2013 Egyptian security forces opened fire at a sit-in protest in Rabaa Al Adawiya Square, killing more than 800 people opposed to the ousting of Egypt’s first democratically-elected president Mohamed Morsi. 

A few weeks earlier, the reign of Morsi, a senior Muslim Brotherhood member, was cut short after only one year in power. Morsi’s ouster was announced on July 3 2013 by the head of the Egyptian Armed Forces Abdel Fattah El Sisi, who later became the president of Egypt.

The Day More Than 800 Egyptian Protesters Died: One Year on Remembering the Horrific Raba’a Massacre

"Each small effort will add up to something much bigger, something that can really make a difference."

When I garden, I think. Surrounded by the stillness of nature, my mind can either be attuned to the present moment, completely engrossed in my task, or it can wander – and these days, it’s been taking long, meandering strolls as I consider the state of my country.

What Gardening Has Taught Me About Civic Responsibility

"Don’t be fooled: the PM’s submissions on constitutional reform only serve to consolidate the two party system."

Trinidad and Tobago’s Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar has tabled constitutional reform to the country’s Parliament that would include a ten-year term limit for the office of prime minister (consecutive or not), the right to recall members of Parliament, and automatic run-offs when no candidate has more than 50 percent of the vote.

Some See a Political Ploy in Trinidad & Tobago’s Proposed Constitutional Reform

"If members of the PAN really want to do something about the minimum wage, they should probably start by trying to live off it themselves."

According to Article 123 of Mexico’s Constitution, the country’s minimum wage should be sufficient to provide the head of a household with the means to satisfy the family’s material, social, and cultural needs and to ensure that any children receive an education.

In reality, however, what minimum wage salary afford Mexico’s workers on a daily basis?

Mexico’s Minimum Wage is Criminally Low. Is It Unconstitutional?

"There should be no questioning or waffling about it. The mere fact that this young man was physically/violently beaten up inside a police station cannot be justified in any manner."

The death of a young man from injuries he allegedly sustained at the hands of the police is causing an uproar in Jamaica, an island nation where police brutality, security force abuses and extrajudicial killings are nothing new.

According to reports, Mario Deane, a resident of the coastal resort town of Montego Bay, was arrested for marijuana possession. He was beaten while in police custody and eventually succumbed to his injuries after being sent to the hospital.

A Man’s Fatal Beating Puts Police Brutality Back on the Front Burner in Jamaica

"I will listen to no ‘grinches’ today, those cynics trying to steal my joy in Emancipation and Independence. We keep talking ourselves into this ditch of despair, instead of raising our voices in thanks for our many blessings."

Jamaica achieved its independence from British rule 52 years ago. Like the citizens of most Caribbean states, Jamaicans today wrangle with the ripple effects of the region’s history, including social and economic challenges.

More Than a Half Century Later, How Should Jamaica View Its Independence Day?

"My personal judgement, personal feeling, is that I am sorry for this crime, for such a monster, that Serbia banned the death penalty, perhaps our society was not prepared for all of the facets of the EU, such as the banning of the death penalty."

Since some of the facts of the crime have become known to the public, a fierce discussion has developed and spread across social networks, blogs, and on the streets of Serbia. A seemingly large portion of the public are calling for the reinstatement of the death penalty for this crime. Several online petitions have been started asking for the reinstatement of the death penalty and, within just 12 hours, at least one hadalmost 4,500 signatures, while Serbian tabloid Kurir claims that over 28,000 people were asking for the lynching of the killer on Facebook.

After a 15-Year-Old’s Gruesome Murder, Some Serbians Seek the Death Penalty’s Return

"Like Putin, Erdogan distrusts social networks, believes his opponents are traitors and invokes external threats to reinforce his popularity at home."

After the Gezi protests, the Turkish mainstream media earned themselves the moniker “penguin media” because of their pro-government messaging and skewed portrayal of the protesters.

When Turkey’s prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan declared his candidacy for the 2014 presidential election, to be held August 10, many expected a second wave of media manipulation. Once the electoral race began in earnest, the media failed to prove them wrong.

Not a Peep From Turkey’s ‘Penguin’ Media About the Opposition

“The regulation helps protect the citizens’ freedom of expression.”

The new regulation also says only official media accounts can post political news; other public accounts wishing to publish political news will now need to seek prior approval. Public WeChat accounts are typically used by individuals or companies to share news with subscribers. With the popularity of WeChat, they have become a major source of news for Chinese people. 

China Tightens Its Control of Popular Messaging App WeChat With Real-Name Registration

"Now that security, safety and public order have been restored to normalcy, the authorities have decided to open Freedom Park from today."

Police removed the barricades and razor wires surrounding Cambodia’s Freedom Park in the capital city of Phnom Penh after local authorities ordered its reopening. The park was closed to the public in January when it became the main site of protest actions against the government. The opposition has been staging mass actions since last year after it rejected the July election results.

Cambodia’s Freedom Park, a Site of Protest and Symbol of Free Expression, Reopens