There is the issue of lack of social conscience by the companies, also a lack of supervision by the state. When can Chinese be assured of eating out?

International brands like Starbucks and Burger King have been dragged into a reputation crisis after one of their suppliers were found supplying expired meat, in the latest nationwide food safety scandal that threatens to disrupt supply chains of fast-food stores across China. 
Shanghai-based Husi Food, a subsidiary of Illinois-based OSI Group, was accused of repackaging expired chicken and beef, meat materials supplied to fast-food chains such as KFC, McDonald’s and Pizza Hut outlets in China.  
Expired Meat Was on the Menu at McDonald’s, KFC and Other Fast Food Restaurants in China

There is the issue of lack of social conscience by the companies, also a lack of supervision by the state. When can Chinese be assured of eating out?

International brands like Starbucks and Burger King have been dragged into a reputation crisis after one of their suppliers were found supplying expired meat, in the latest nationwide food safety scandal that threatens to disrupt supply chains of fast-food stores across China. 

Shanghai-based Husi Food, a subsidiary of Illinois-based OSI Group, was accused of repackaging expired chicken and beef, meat materials supplied to fast-food chains such as KFC, McDonald’s and Pizza Hut outlets in China.  

Expired Meat Was on the Menu at McDonald’s, KFC and Other Fast Food Restaurants in China

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"We must review the extent to which our development agenda fosters criminality, thus, making criminals not an anomaly but an inevitability […] accepting extra judicial killings in lieu of justice is not and cannot be the answer."

Crime in Trinidad and Tobago has been on the increase over the past decade or more thanks to the rise of gun-toting gangs fueled by the illicit drug trade. Now, amidst allegations that the government has actually been sanctioning these criminal elements by putting them on the state’s payroll, citizens are more skeptical than ever about crime and how it is being dealt with.

As Trinidad & Tobago’s Military Hunts Down a Killer, Some Wonder Who’s ‘Guarding the Guards’

When it comes to Wikipedia, the Russian government’s computers are busy bees. Over the past ten years, IP addresses belonging to various Russian state agencies are responsible for almost 7,000 anonymous edits to articles on Wikipedia’s Russian-language website.

It’s entirely plausible that these revisions are the work of state employees acting on their own, out of genuine interest in “setting the record straight.”

The Russian Government’s 7,000 Wikipedia Edits

"He witnessed the crime with his own eyes.. and they couldn’t handle his honesty in doing his journalistic duty.. So they kicked him out of Gaza"

Bahrain has denied countless international journalists entry into the country amid a fierce crackdown on anti-regime protesters. Over a hundred people have been killed and thousands jailed since protests broke out in February 2011. The ruling Sunni monarchy has stifled free expression — and continues to do so. 

It’s no wonder then that a tweet by Bahrain’s Foreign Affairs Minister Khalid Alkhalifa on the double standards employed by the international press in covering the latest Israeli assault on Gaza would raise more than a few eyebrows.

Bahrain’s Foreign Minister Seems to Have Forgotten His Country’s Ill Treatment of Journalists

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“It is also necessary to remind everyone that the liberation of Palestine can only be accomplished through the overthrowing of all the authoritarian regimes in the region, which are complicit in the suffering of the Palestinian people. (…) This is why opposing any popular revolution in the region is not only betraying the cause of the people of Syria, Egypt, Tunisia, Bahrain and elsewhere, but also betraying the Palestinian cause and its people.”

The Palestinian struggle has always been very present in Syria, but it was not until 2011 that Syrians got a taste of what resistance really means. 

“Syria is with you, Gaza”

Many activists in Hong Kong have dared to confront police during recent pro-democracy demonstrations. In fact, more than 500 protesters stood their ground against authorities by refusing to leave a sit-in in early July and were arrested for it.  
But some of those same people are struggling to muster similar courage at the dinner table to argue with their parents about political reform. 
The older generation tends to support the status quo; they believe protests and occupations will bring political and economic instability. The younger generation are determined to fight for genuine democracy risking their future careers. This tension is usually reflected in conversation during family meals.
China has promised Hong Kong a direct vote for the next chief executive in 2017 instead of election via committee, but insists that a committee approve the candidates. Former British colony Hong Kong is a special administrative region of China and enjoys a high level of autonomy from the communist country under the idea of “one country, two systems.” 
Given that China considers “love of country” to be an important criteria for Hong Kong’s administrators, according to a recently released white paper from the government, protesters suspect Hong Kong will only have pro-Beijing candidates to choose from, defeating the purpose of a direct vote. 
Pro-Democracy Protesters in Hong Kong Can Face Down Police, but Not Their Mom and Dad at the Dinner Table

Many activists in Hong Kong have dared to confront police during recent pro-democracy demonstrations. In fact, more than 500 protesters stood their ground against authorities by refusing to leave a sit-in in early July and were arrested for it.  

But some of those same people are struggling to muster similar courage at the dinner table to argue with their parents about political reform. 

The older generation tends to support the status quo; they believe protests and occupations will bring political and economic instability. The younger generation are determined to fight for genuine democracy risking their future careers. This tension is usually reflected in conversation during family meals.

China has promised Hong Kong a direct vote for the next chief executive in 2017 instead of election via committee, but insists that a committee approve the candidates. Former British colony Hong Kong is a special administrative region of China and enjoys a high level of autonomy from the communist country under the idea of “one country, two systems.” 

Given that China considers “love of country” to be an important criteria for Hong Kong’s administrators, according to a recently released white paper from the government, protesters suspect Hong Kong will only have pro-Beijing candidates to choose from, defeating the purpose of a direct vote. 

Pro-Democracy Protesters in Hong Kong Can Face Down Police, but Not Their Mom and Dad at the Dinner Table


Mugu, one of the poorest districts in Nepal, doesn’t have a single football stadium. But it does have a star football player as revered as Argentina’s famous son Lionel Messi – and she happens to be a girl.
Sunakali and her team were welcomed home there after winning the women’s national football tournament as if they had won the World Cup in Brazil, reported Mysansar, a popular Nepalese blog.
The young women left their mountainous district for the first time to compete in the tournament in Kailali, a journey of hundreds of kilometers. They walked two days to reach the airstrip, and travelled in a plane, rickshaw and bullock cart for the very first time in their lives. There are no direct roads between Kailali and Mugu, and the ones that do exist are in poor condition.
At the tournament, the Mugu team played with Badikhel Team of Lalitpur district, Baliya Team of Kailali and Team Patharaiya before meeting with Team Tikapur in the finals. Team Mugu won and Sunakali was named the best striker.
It was an impressive achievement for many reasons, including the fact that the young women were only introduced to the sport in 2011. In Mugu, the average life expectancy is reported to be 47 years, with men at 49 and women at 39. Nearly two-thirds of girls aged 15 to 19 are married, and female literacy rate stands at 9 percent. 

When the victorious team returned, locals met them at the airstrip chanting, “Sunakali, like Messi!” Horses were arranged for the young women to ride back to the village, an honor in Mugu where it is unusual for women to ride the animals. 

This Young Woman Footballer Is More Popular Than Messi in Her Remote Village in Nepal

Mugu, one of the poorest districts in Nepal, doesn’t have a single football stadium. But it does have a star football player as revered as Argentina’s famous son Lionel Messi – and she happens to be a girl.

Sunakali and her team were welcomed home there after winning the women’s national football tournament as if they had won the World Cup in Brazil, reported Mysansar, a popular Nepalese blog.

The young women left their mountainous district for the first time to compete in the tournament in Kailali, a journey of hundreds of kilometers. They walked two days to reach the airstrip, and travelled in a plane, rickshaw and bullock cart for the very first time in their lives. There are no direct roads between Kailali and Mugu, and the ones that do exist are in poor condition.

At the tournament, the Mugu team played with Badikhel Team of Lalitpur district, Baliya Team of Kailali and Team Patharaiya before meeting with Team Tikapur in the finals. Team Mugu won and Sunakali was named the best striker.

It was an impressive achievement for many reasons, including the fact that the young women were only introduced to the sport in 2011. In Mugu, the average life expectancy is reported to be 47 years, with men at 49 and women at 39. Nearly two-thirds of girls aged 15 to 19 are married, and female literacy rate stands at 9 percent. 

When the victorious team returned, locals met them at the airstrip chanting, “Sunakali, like Messi!” Horses were arranged for the young women to ride back to the village, an honor in Mugu where it is unusual for women to ride the animals. 

This Young Woman Footballer Is More Popular Than Messi in Her Remote Village in Nepal


Throughout its 35 years of existence, the Islamic Republic of Iran has not tolerated free expression or public gatherings beyond its control. Facebook offers some semblance of both of these things on an easy-to-use platform. What might Iranian citizens do if granted unbridled access to Facebook? Persecuting—and prosecuting—Facebook users is a way to instill fear in the population. The recent cases provide a chilling example of what could happen to Iranians who try to express their ideas online.  
Iran and Facebook: A doomed romance?
The government’s relationship with Iran’s most popular social network is complicated, tenuous, and often appears to vacillate between love and hate. Despite the fact that Facebook is filtered in Iran, President Hassan Rouhani and many in his cabinet, particularly Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, are among the most savvy and popular Facebook users within Iran. All 2013 presidential candidates, approved by the highest authorities within Iran known as the Guardian Council, used Facebook to promote their campaigns. This tacit acceptance of the platform by those within the elite highlights two facts. The first is that filtering does not work within Iran. The Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance has verified this claim by stating he estimates about 4 million Iranians use Facebook. Second, Iran does not hate Facebook; rather Iran wants to control.

Fear, Love and Iran’s Favorite Internet Enemy (it’s Facebook)

Throughout its 35 years of existence, the Islamic Republic of Iran has not tolerated free expression or public gatherings beyond its control. Facebook offers some semblance of both of these things on an easy-to-use platform. What might Iranian citizens do if granted unbridled access to Facebook? Persecuting—and prosecuting—Facebook users is a way to instill fear in the population. The recent cases provide a chilling example of what could happen to Iranians who try to express their ideas online.  

Iran and Facebook: A doomed romance?

The government’s relationship with Iran’s most popular social network is complicated, tenuous, and often appears to vacillate between love and hate. Despite the fact that Facebook is filtered in Iran, President Hassan Rouhani and many in his cabinet, particularly Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, are among the most savvy and popular Facebook users within Iran. All 2013 presidential candidates, approved by the highest authorities within Iran known as the Guardian Council, used Facebook to promote their campaigns. This tacit acceptance of the platform by those within the elite highlights two facts. The first is that filtering does not work within Iran. The Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance has verified this claim by stating he estimates about 4 million Iranians use Facebook. Second, Iran does not hate Facebook; rather Iran wants to control.

Fear, Love and Iran’s Favorite Internet Enemy (it’s Facebook)


Perhaps human rights is defined differently in regions of the world.

Bangladesh’s Elite Paramiltary Unit Is Under Fire for Human Rights Violations. This Blogger Asks: What About Israel’s IDF?
Climate change is hitting the Pacific Islands hard. Sea levels are rising, temperatures are increasing, and worsening storm surges and flooding have contaminated fresh water supplies and ruined crops. Already, residents of one island have decided to leave because of these devastating effects.
It’s only expected to get worse, yet Australia has renewed its embrace of fossil fuels despite the plight of its Pacific neighbors.
But Pacific Islanders are fighting back — with canoes. People from 16 different countries will voyage to Australia as part of 350.org’s Pacific Warrior Campaign to deliver traditional canoes to major supporters of the fossil fuel industry with the aim of showing them that Pacific Islanders will work peacefully to protect their cultures, homelands and oceans.
How Pacific Islanders Are Fighting Climate Change With Canoes

Climate change is hitting the Pacific Islands hard. Sea levels are rising, temperatures are increasing, and worsening storm surges and flooding have contaminated fresh water supplies and ruined crops. Already, residents of one island have decided to leave because of these devastating effects.

It’s only expected to get worse, yet Australia has renewed its embrace of fossil fuels despite the plight of its Pacific neighbors.

But Pacific Islanders are fighting back — with canoes. People from 16 different countries will voyage to Australia as part of 350.org’s Pacific Warrior Campaign to deliver traditional canoes to major supporters of the fossil fuel industry with the aim of showing them that Pacific Islanders will work peacefully to protect their cultures, homelands and oceans.

How Pacific Islanders Are Fighting Climate Change With Canoes