When I knock on the door of yet another Kyrgyz politician, civil servant or businessman, I have many questions. That’s my job as a journalist. But the most nerve-racking question is not in my notebook: Will he hit on me?
The first time I interviewed an official in Bishkek, he tried to hold my hand while we were alone in his office. I left, humiliated, thinking this would never happen again. I was wrong.
The idea that women are no more than pieces of meat is deeply engrained here. Indeed, until recently, Kyrgyz law called sheep rustling a more serious crime than bride kidnapping.
This compelling blog post was originally written by Kyrgyz journalist Asel Kalybekova for EurasiaNet.org’s Inside the Cocoon blog under the title Bishkek Journal: I want an Interview, Not a Date.
Gender battles continue to play a central role in Kyrgyz politics and society. While women occupy prominent positions in public life, notably more so than in the country’s immediate neighbors, the constant grind of negative stereotyping and harassment affects the way many are able to do their job. 
Try Being a Female Journalist in Kyrgyzstan. Your Male Sources Hit on You. All the Time.

When I knock on the door of yet another Kyrgyz politician, civil servant or businessman, I have many questions. That’s my job as a journalist. But the most nerve-racking question is not in my notebook: Will he hit on me?

The first time I interviewed an official in Bishkek, he tried to hold my hand while we were alone in his office. I left, humiliated, thinking this would never happen again. I was wrong.

The idea that women are no more than pieces of meat is deeply engrained here. Indeed, until recently, Kyrgyz law called sheep rustling a more serious crime than bride kidnapping.

This compelling blog post was originally written by Kyrgyz journalist Asel Kalybekova for EurasiaNet.org’s Inside the Cocoon blog under the title Bishkek Journal: I want an Interview, Not a Date.

Gender battles continue to play a central role in Kyrgyz politics and society. While women occupy prominent positions in public life, notably more so than in the country’s immediate neighbors, the constant grind of negative stereotyping and harassment affects the way many are able to do their job. 

Try Being a Female Journalist in Kyrgyzstan. Your Male Sources Hit on You. All the Time.

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