Posts tagged Arab

Zoomaal and HIVOS announce a creativity competition for cultural and artistic projects in the Arab world.

Zoomaal and HIVOS announce a creativity competition for cultural and artistic projects in the Arab world.

shocking act of terror.As a Muslim,an Arab & a Saudi condemn this.No matter the religion & origin of the attacker.

In the West, hacking is more or less considered part of a geeky and rather privileged culture. On the other side of the Mediterranean, it is rather the product of revolution, giving a new impulse towards collaborative practices and innovations, spaces that are open to everyone

Mahmoud El-Safty co-founded Giza Hackerspace and Fab Lab Egypt, the first of their kind in Egypt, with both projects located in Giza, in the suburbs of Cairo. This young, smiling engineer speaks with enthusiasm about his faith in hackerspaces/makerspaces.
Hackers in Arab Cities: Fab Lab and Tech in Egypt

In the West, hacking is more or less considered part of a geeky and rather privileged culture. On the other side of the Mediterranean, it is rather the product of revolution, giving a new impulse towards collaborative practices and innovations, spaces that are open to everyone

Mahmoud El-Safty co-founded Giza Hackerspace and Fab Lab Egypt, the first of their kind in Egypt, with both projects located in Giza, in the suburbs of Cairo. This young, smiling engineer speaks with enthusiasm about his faith in hackerspaces/makerspaces.

Hackers in Arab Cities: Fab Lab and Tech in Egypt

Oh my God!!! The number of self-immolations in Tunisia:
2 in 2010
91 in 2011
63 in 2012
11 in 2013
Source: Mosaique FM. But they have not reported on the number of deaths.

Adel Khadri, a 27-year-old cigarette street vendor set himself on fire on Tunis’ main street Habib Bourguiba Avenue on March 12, 2013. According to eye witnesses, Khadri shouted: “This is a young man who sells cigarettes because of unemployment,” before flames consumed his body. Khadri passed away early this morning at Ben Arous’ Burns Hospital.

Cigarette Vendor Sets Himself on Fire, Self-immolations Continue in Tunisia

"@docjazzmusic: Symbolic? We are already drowning in symbolism. Give us back our land, our rights, our freedom, not a ‘symbolic’ gesture u call a ‘state’."

"@docjazzmusic: While they support ‘Israel’ politically, economically & militarily, they support Palestine symbolically. And we’re supposed to cheer."

"@muiz: UN is a shining beacon of why words are so hollow & actions substantive. So much verbal support for #Palestine - so little tangible action"

"@livefromgaza: Ramallah is not my capital, Jerusalem is. And ALL of Palestine is my homeland. NO to #Palestine194"

At the UN General Assembly meeting last night, 138 countries technically voted in favour of naming Palestine the world’s 194th state by accepting its status as a non-member state at the world body.

The upgrade of Palestine from an “entity” to a “non-member state” at the United Nations received a lukewarm reaction from netizens - who asked what a ‘symbolic’ gesture like recognising Palestine at the United Nations would do to Palestinians, particularly those living under Israeli occupation and refugees.

Read more reactions from the Arab world on Global Voices.

Forum for Arab Culture, a Bulgarian NGO, asks -Was it right for Bulgarian national daily 24 chasa to publish its ‘Are You a Terrorist?’ quiz?
Source

Forum for Arab Culture, a Bulgarian NGO, asks -

Was it right for Bulgarian national daily 24 chasa to publish its ‘Are You a Terrorist?’ quiz?

Source

onenefes:

SEVDALINKA - WHAT IS SEVDALINKA?!
Sevdalinka isa traditional Bosnian urban love song. The origins of sevdalinka date back to the Ottoman Empire of Bosnia. It was banned for lovers to meet on the streets, hold their hands, so a lot of times people expressed their feelings through the songs. The most of lyrics of those songs talk about the longing for a loved one, looking at his girl through the fence of her garden, describing moments when they two would sneak out and so on. A lot of times there were arranged marriages so the lovers had to separate, a lot of songs talk exactly about this.
The word sevdalinka comes from Arabic word “Sawdah” which means black gall, in Turkish language word “Sevda” got the meaning in love, while in Bosnian “Sevdah” means longing in love, losing yourself in love, the deepest emotions of your soul are sevdah. Somehow they combine the Arabic and Turkish meaning of the word. The lyrics of sevdalinka were in colloquial language, and in early periods it was played on saz only. After the Austrian occupation, the accordion became the main instrument in sevdalina, however some kept the Saz (Bosnian kind of Oud).. The authors of sevdalika are usually unknown, since they were made among young people, but a lot of Bosnian poets like Aleksa Šantić, Safvet beg-Bašagić, and Osman Dikić are authors of sevdalinka. The golden era of sevdalinka was until the WWII but there were some great sevdalinkas composed in 60’s and 70’s that were perfectly made.
The performance of sevdalinka has to be quiet. Audience shouldn’t feel like you’re trying hard or it is pain for you. Easy and slowly, enjoying and falling in “sevdah” (something similar to Tarrab in Arabic music). The performer also has to bring himself to the lyrics as if he was the one who experienced the story in a song. Musically the sound of sevdalinka is hardly influenced by Arabic and Turkish music, but also you can hear some Spanish influences which were brought by Sephardic Jews who populated Bosnia in 15th century.Bosnian Jews made a lot of songs in Ladino (Spanish-Hebrew) language, and were later translated to Bosnian. Example is one of the most famous sevdalinkas “Kad ja pođoh”, recorded in New York 1943 by Zinka Kunc. Beside those, you can also hear some Slavic, Mediterranean and Romani tunes.

onenefes:

SEVDALINKA - WHAT IS SEVDALINKA?!

Sevdalinka isa traditional Bosnian urban love song. The origins of sevdalinka date back to the Ottoman Empire of Bosnia. It was banned for lovers to meet on the streets, hold their hands, so a lot of times people expressed their feelings through the songs. The most of lyrics of those songs talk about the longing for a loved one, looking at his girl through the fence of her garden, describing moments when they two would sneak out and so on. A lot of times there were arranged marriages so the lovers had to separate, a lot of songs talk exactly about this.

The word sevdalinka comes from Arabic word “Sawdah” which means black gall, in Turkish language word “Sevda” got the meaning in love, while in Bosnian “Sevdah” means longing in love, losing yourself in love, the deepest emotions of your soul are sevdah. Somehow they combine the Arabic and Turkish meaning of the word. The lyrics of sevdalinka were in colloquial language, and in early periods it was played on saz only. After the Austrian occupation, the accordion became the main instrument in sevdalina, however some kept the Saz (Bosnian kind of Oud).. The authors of sevdalika are usually unknown, since they were made among young people, but a lot of Bosnian poets like Aleksa Šantić, Safvet beg-Bašagić, and Osman Dikić are authors of sevdalinka. The golden era of sevdalinka was until the WWII but there were some great sevdalinkas composed in 60’s and 70’s that were perfectly made.

The performance of sevdalinka has to be quiet. Audience shouldn’t feel like you’re trying hard or it is pain for you. Easy and slowly, enjoying and falling in “sevdah” (something similar to Tarrab in Arabic music). The performer also has to bring himself to the lyrics as if he was the one who experienced the story in a song. Musically the sound of sevdalinka is hardly influenced by Arabic and Turkish music, but also you can hear some Spanish influences which were brought by Sephardic Jews who populated Bosnia in 15th century.Bosnian Jews made a lot of songs in Ladino (Spanish-Hebrew) language, and were later translated to Bosnian. Example is one of the most famous sevdalinkas “Kad ja pođoh”, recorded in New York 1943 by Zinka Kunc. Beside those, you can also hear some Slavic, Mediterranean and Romani tunes.

Read our collection of Arab World netizen reactions to last night’s attack on the US Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, in which four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens, were killed.


thepoliticalnotebook:

This is the introduction video made for Chris Stevens, the US Ambassador to Libya, who was killed Tuesday night along with three other Americans in an attack on the consulate in Benghazi. Here, he introduces himself and his history and his plans for working with Libya during its post-Gaddhafi reconstruction and transition.

One of the other Americans has been identified by the State Dept. as Foreign Service Information Officer Sean Smith. The statement by Secretary Clinton on the attacks is here.

[YouTube]

Not a day goes by without a black African suffering from racial abuse. The most often-used insult is “Guira Guira,” which, according to some means in a local dialect “big monkey”. For many Tunisians, we black Africans are savages.
Frederick Gore Djo Bi writes on africavox.com about the rise of racism against black Africans in Tunisia.
Two Arabs arguing: One says, “You’re Shia” and the other says, “You’re Sunni” and the TV screen reads, “Curiosity lands on Mars”.
Cartoon by Kuwait-based cartoonist Hashimoto.
Following rover Curiosity’s successful landing on Mars, Arabs on Twitter lamented the miserable state of science in the Arab world - little scientific output and very few patents.
“The news of NASA’s rover landing on Mars coincides with Jordan’s entry to the Guinness Book of World Records for making “the biggest falafel” and there is no condolence for the rest of Arabs,” tweeted a blogger from Saudi Arabia.
Read more reactions from bloggers in "Curiosity Rover and Arab Scientific Decay" on Global Voices.

Two Arabs arguing: One says, “You’re Shia” and the other says, “You’re Sunni” and the TV screen reads, “Curiosity lands on Mars”.

Cartoon by Kuwait-based cartoonist Hashimoto.

Following rover Curiosity’s successful landing on Mars, Arabs on Twitter lamented the miserable state of science in the Arab world - little scientific output and very few patents.

The news of NASA’s rover landing on Mars coincides with Jordan’s entry to the Guinness Book of World Records for making “the biggest falafel” and there is no condolence for the rest of Arabs,” tweeted a blogger from Saudi Arabia.

Read more reactions from bloggers in "Curiosity Rover and Arab Scientific Decay" on Global Voices.