Posts tagged revolution

#AskGVaboutSyria What is really going on in Syria?

 

image

Global Voices will be discussing this with our Syria author Leila Nachawati and our RuNet editor Kevin Rothrock.

Join us or send your questions by replying to this post

back to the Stone Age…

Death is death, regardless of the way it is done. Assad has killed more than 150,000. Stop him.

From Kafranbel: The Syrian Revolution in Three Minutes

Syria Untold is a new independent digital media project partnering with Global Voices that aims to tell the story of the Syrian revolution beyond the battles that the mainstream media is missing. Check out newly launched www.syriauntold.com. 
‘Syria Untold’: The Storytelling of the Syrian Revolution

Syria Untold is a new independent digital media project partnering with Global Voices that aims to tell the story of the Syrian revolution beyond the battles that the mainstream media is missing. Check out newly launched www.syriauntold.com

‘Syria Untold’: The Storytelling of the Syrian Revolution


"In 2009, Zahra and her family, along with millions of Iranians took to the streets to demand fair and free elections. Despite a brutal crackdown, the promise of an Iranian spring—democracy, dignity, and justice—is far from extinguished." 

Zahra is the hero of a graphic novel whose 19-year-old son, Mehdi, disappeared after participating in demonstrations against the outcome of Iran’s 2009 election. Now, the comic and activists have launched a virtual campaign, Zahra For President 2013, to expose Iran’s corrupt political system through satire.
Is Iran’s Most Believable Presidential Candidate a Fictional Character?

"In 2009, Zahra and her family, along with millions of Iranians took to the streets to demand fair and free elections. Despite a brutal crackdown, the promise of an Iranian spring—democracy, dignity, and justice—is far from extinguished." 

Zahra is the hero of a graphic novel whose 19-year-old son, Mehdi, disappeared after participating in demonstrations against the outcome of Iran’s 2009 election. Now, the comic and activists have launched a virtual campaign, Zahra For President 2013, to expose Iran’s corrupt political system through satire.

Is Iran’s Most Believable Presidential Candidate a Fictional Character?

"President Morsi as an octopus swimming in a sea of blood." Graffiti on Presidential Palace Walls, tells the story of Egypt’s Revolution.
Photograph by Jonathan Rashad (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
See more photos here.

"President Morsi as an octopus swimming in a sea of blood." 

Graffiti on Presidential Palace Walls, tells the story of Egypt’s Revolution.

Photograph by Jonathan Rashad (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

See more photos here.

Oh well, if 40 policemen are needed to arrest a single man with a tomato, for a man with an aubergine, we’ll need to call NATO

On November 20  I will buy from the supermarket 6 (six) rotten tomatoes and distribute them to one of the six institutions which I addressed. At 10 am, I will be in front of the Parliament, and I will throw a tomato at its facade in protest against the lack of orientation, professionalism and patriotism in lawmaking. I will do so to protest low-quality law texts bringing only misfortunes to the society and the Bulgarian citizen. The law should be socially useful, not crafted against the people. Then I will go to the Presidential palace and hurl the next tomato at its facade. It will be against the consistent inaction by the presidential institution, its stooped posture while meeting with international representatives and the appointment of lowlives as diplomats. [I will throw it] against the uncritical attitude in signing the decrees of laws coming into force. The third tomato will be thrown in front of the Prime Minister’s HQs for overall policies and actions against the society and national interests. The fourth tomato will be thrown against the Courthouse. I don’t need to explain why to my compatriots. The fifth and the sixth tomatoes will be thrown against the Bulgarian National Television and the Bulgarian National Radio because they serve a small bunch of political criminals and gangsters on our money.

From an open letter published on November 14 by Nikolay Kolev, aka Bossiya (The Barefoot) on his blog.

On November 20, Bossiya was arrested in front of the Parliament, where reportedly 40 policemen were deployed waiting for him to show up.

On November 24, with rotten tomatoes in hand, people gathered in front of the Bulgarian Parliament in the capital city of Sofia to show support for Bossiya and kick start what has come to be known as Bulgaria’s Tomato Revolution.

Read reactions from Bulgaria’s citizen media here. 

Tunisia did not experience a “Twitter Revolution” says USIP report on the influence of social media on Tunisia’s public uprising in 2010-11. Nawaat reviews the report.

Tunisia did not experience a “Twitter Revolution” says USIP report on the influence of social media on Tunisia’s public uprising in 2010-11. Nawaat reviews the report.

nickturse:

Faces of the Syrian Revolution

The Battle of Aleppo

PHOTOGRAPHED BY: Ricardo Garcia Vilanova/Corbis
I was threatened, blackmailed, insulted, emotionally abused and psychologically tortured…One interrogator said to me: “Take a good look at the window, this will be the last time you ever see the sun.”… [Another] saw a picture of me and my best friend hugging. He then asked me if I was a lesbian.

Sudanese blogger and Global Voices Author Maha Elsanosi vividly describes her three days of interrogation at the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS), after being arrested in Sudan.

Read more here.

@womanfromyemen tweets: heard this at least 3 times today “how can my kids study for their finals w/out any electricity?” #Yemen Nothing seems to have changed with the overthrow of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh and living conditions only seem to get worse in Yemen.

@womanfromyemen tweets: heard this at least 3 times today “how can my kids study for their finals w/out any electricity?” #Yemen 

Nothing seems to have changed with the overthrow of former president Ali Abdullah Saleh and living conditions only seem to get worse in Yemen.