Posts tagged urban

Preserving The Hidden History Of Old Dhaka
“The media are censoring our reality! Tell the truth!” This summer, Přednádraží, a small neighborhood in the Czech Republic, has been the site of an intense struggle against unlawful evictions of the predominantly Roma residents. 
The Czech media call Přednádraží a ghetto, without pausing to reflect what this word means and how it might relate to history. Přednádraží, which in literal translation means “in front of the train station,” is in fact located behind the Main Train Station of Ostrava, the same train station in front of which stands the modest memorial to Ostrava’s Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Thousands of the Czech Roma perished in the Holocaust, but this memorial does not include them.
Find out more about the history and present struggle of Přednádraží’s residents.

“The media are censoring our reality! Tell the truth!” 

This summer, Přednádraží, a small neighborhood in the Czech Republic, has been the site of an intense struggle against unlawful evictions of the predominantly Roma residents. 

The Czech media call Přednádraží a ghetto, without pausing to reflect what this word means and how it might relate to history. Přednádraží, which in literal translation means “in front of the train station,” is in fact located behind the Main Train Station of Ostrava, the same train station in front of which stands the modest memorial to Ostrava’s Jewish victims of the Holocaust. Thousands of the Czech Roma perished in the Holocaust, but this memorial does not include them.

Find out more about the history and present struggle of Přednádraží’s residents.

onenefes:

SEVDALINKA - WHAT IS SEVDALINKA?!
Sevdalinka isa traditional Bosnian urban love song. The origins of sevdalinka date back to the Ottoman Empire of Bosnia. It was banned for lovers to meet on the streets, hold their hands, so a lot of times people expressed their feelings through the songs. The most of lyrics of those songs talk about the longing for a loved one, looking at his girl through the fence of her garden, describing moments when they two would sneak out and so on. A lot of times there were arranged marriages so the lovers had to separate, a lot of songs talk exactly about this.
The word sevdalinka comes from Arabic word “Sawdah” which means black gall, in Turkish language word “Sevda” got the meaning in love, while in Bosnian “Sevdah” means longing in love, losing yourself in love, the deepest emotions of your soul are sevdah. Somehow they combine the Arabic and Turkish meaning of the word. The lyrics of sevdalinka were in colloquial language, and in early periods it was played on saz only. After the Austrian occupation, the accordion became the main instrument in sevdalina, however some kept the Saz (Bosnian kind of Oud).. The authors of sevdalika are usually unknown, since they were made among young people, but a lot of Bosnian poets like Aleksa Šantić, Safvet beg-Bašagić, and Osman Dikić are authors of sevdalinka. The golden era of sevdalinka was until the WWII but there were some great sevdalinkas composed in 60’s and 70’s that were perfectly made.
The performance of sevdalinka has to be quiet. Audience shouldn’t feel like you’re trying hard or it is pain for you. Easy and slowly, enjoying and falling in “sevdah” (something similar to Tarrab in Arabic music). The performer also has to bring himself to the lyrics as if he was the one who experienced the story in a song. Musically the sound of sevdalinka is hardly influenced by Arabic and Turkish music, but also you can hear some Spanish influences which were brought by Sephardic Jews who populated Bosnia in 15th century.Bosnian Jews made a lot of songs in Ladino (Spanish-Hebrew) language, and were later translated to Bosnian. Example is one of the most famous sevdalinkas “Kad ja pođoh”, recorded in New York 1943 by Zinka Kunc. Beside those, you can also hear some Slavic, Mediterranean and Romani tunes.

onenefes:

SEVDALINKA - WHAT IS SEVDALINKA?!

Sevdalinka isa traditional Bosnian urban love song. The origins of sevdalinka date back to the Ottoman Empire of Bosnia. It was banned for lovers to meet on the streets, hold their hands, so a lot of times people expressed their feelings through the songs. The most of lyrics of those songs talk about the longing for a loved one, looking at his girl through the fence of her garden, describing moments when they two would sneak out and so on. A lot of times there were arranged marriages so the lovers had to separate, a lot of songs talk exactly about this.

The word sevdalinka comes from Arabic word “Sawdah” which means black gall, in Turkish language word “Sevda” got the meaning in love, while in Bosnian “Sevdah” means longing in love, losing yourself in love, the deepest emotions of your soul are sevdah. Somehow they combine the Arabic and Turkish meaning of the word. The lyrics of sevdalinka were in colloquial language, and in early periods it was played on saz only. After the Austrian occupation, the accordion became the main instrument in sevdalina, however some kept the Saz (Bosnian kind of Oud).. The authors of sevdalika are usually unknown, since they were made among young people, but a lot of Bosnian poets like Aleksa Šantić, Safvet beg-Bašagić, and Osman Dikić are authors of sevdalinka. The golden era of sevdalinka was until the WWII but there were some great sevdalinkas composed in 60’s and 70’s that were perfectly made.

The performance of sevdalinka has to be quiet. Audience shouldn’t feel like you’re trying hard or it is pain for you. Easy and slowly, enjoying and falling in “sevdah” (something similar to Tarrab in Arabic music). The performer also has to bring himself to the lyrics as if he was the one who experienced the story in a song. Musically the sound of sevdalinka is hardly influenced by Arabic and Turkish music, but also you can hear some Spanish influences which were brought by Sephardic Jews who populated Bosnia in 15th century.Bosnian Jews made a lot of songs in Ladino (Spanish-Hebrew) language, and were later translated to Bosnian. Example is one of the most famous sevdalinkas “Kad ja pođoh”, recorded in New York 1943 by Zinka Kunc. Beside those, you can also hear some Slavic, Mediterranean and Romani tunes.

A study by The Economist Intelligence on the most liveable cities in the world, suggests that six out of the ten least liveable cities in the world are situated in Africa. However, another ranking by the New Economics Foundation shows that, based on the HPI (Happy Planet Index), residents in certain African countries are happier than those in several European nations.
So where are we exactly, when it comes to urban quality of life in Africa?

In this time of economic crisis graffiti art is rife with social demands, and like it or not, has become part of our daily life.

Read ‘Graffiti in Times of Crisis’

In this time of economic crisis graffiti art is rife with social demands, and like it or not, has become part of our daily life.

Read ‘Graffiti in Times of Crisis

If good ideas transcend boundaries, this one does it by bicycle. That is, by Bicicloteca, a bicycle that carries a small library through the city of São Paulo, Brazil.
The project is a creative and dynamic way to encourage reading, especially among people who live on the streets, because libraries typically require identification and proof of residence to loan books; documents which homeless people don’t have.
The Bicicloteca initiative has emerged from this very need and has gained support from São Paulo residents, media and businesses. As of August 2012, it has been distributing books and encouraging reading for a year.
The Bicicloteca is ridden by Robson Mendonça, a 61-year-old librarian who used to live on the streets of São Paulo. Reading the George Orwell novel Animal Farm was a catalyst for his change, shifting his perspective and proving that reading transforms people’s lives.

If good ideas transcend boundaries, this one does it by bicycle. That is, by Bicicloteca, a bicycle that carries a small library through the city of São Paulo, Brazil.

The project is a creative and dynamic way to encourage reading, especially among people who live on the streets, because libraries typically require identification and proof of residence to loan books; documents which homeless people don’t have.

The Bicicloteca initiative has emerged from this very need and has gained support from São Paulo residents, media and businesses. As of August 2012, it has been distributing books and encouraging reading for a year.

The Bicicloteca is ridden by Robson Mendonça, a 61-year-old librarian who used to live on the streets of São Paulo. Reading the George Orwell novel Animal Farm was a catalyst for his change, shifting his perspective and proving that reading transforms people’s lives.

sightsoflagos:

Muri Okunola Park in Victoria Island. One of the few public parks recently created in Lagos.

sightsoflagos:

Muri Okunola Park in Victoria Island. One of the few public parks recently created in Lagos.

thisbigcity:

Which city has seen 800 new parks and green spaces introduced in the last 6 years? Tehran.

thisbigcity:

Which city has seen 800 new parks and green spaces introduced in the last 6 years? Tehran.

This is how a mural, created a few days ago by urban artists committed to non-violence ended up in Venezuela.Friends of the government covered it with a bunch of posters of the candidate’s official campaign. 
"Very clear message. Violence versus non-violence," says Venezuelan blogger Mitchelle Vidal. 
Find out what other bloggers in Venezuela are saying about the the current campaign and upcoming election. 

This is how a mural, created a few days ago by urban artists committed to non-violence ended up in Venezuela.

Friends of the government covered it with a bunch of posters of the candidate’s official campaign. 

"Very clear message. Violence versus non-violence," says Venezuelan blogger Mitchelle Vidal. 

Find out what other bloggers in Venezuela are saying about the the current campaign and upcoming election. 




“In Chile, contemporary urban art finds a great “art for everyone” gallery, placing great works in various cities and public spaces.
According to Hervé Chadnés, a curator of contemporary art, graffiti has much resonance in Chile due to the strong protest movements that saw in walls a place to house their complaints.”

Discover Latin American graffiti and urban art

In Chile, contemporary urban art finds a great “art for everyone” gallery, placing great works in various cities and public spaces.

According to Hervé Chadnés, a curator of contemporary art, graffiti has much resonance in Chile due to the strong protest movements that saw in walls a place to house their complaints.”

Discover Latin American graffiti and urban art